Just In Case the World Ends Tomorrow…

doomsday-618x478.jpg
Here are a few things I let come to my mind. There’s no rhyme or reason how they fell. Just some jotting-down of thoughts on the subjects that ran through my mind and down to my fingertips in anticipation of the big day!

Life

Is neither hard nor easy. Instead it’s to be navigated like an open sea. Sometimes it is peaceful, beautiful, with awesome sunsets and clear nights. Other times it’s a raging monster and you are enveloped in pitch black, all disoriented, and helplessly unsure. All you want is to find a safe harbor. Then you realize ships aren’t made for harbors. Harbors were made for ships. So you draw anchor and sail again.

Sometimes I think I’ve missed it entirely.

Even those who were successful at it still provide us with great examples of failure.

Death

Is a fact.

Some are natural, others are terribly tragic.

None are easy.

Someone somewhere will miss the one who as passed regardless of the one who did the passing.

Will be around as long as there is life.

Can be explained simply as a consequence of time and chance.

I fear it.

Me

I believe in God and an afterlife; though I’m not mystical, overly spiritual or terribly religious. But, I am all of the above in some regards.

I’ve been skinny dipping.

I’ve been punched in the nose and been given a black eye.

I’ve failed even when I tried my hardest.

I’ve blew some really great opportunities.

I’ve outperformed my peers (and feel a devilish satisfaction for doing it).

I once wrote and gave a great speech. To overcome my nerves, I pretended I was a great leader addressing an assembly. It was an act and it worked.

I floss everyday and brush my teeth two to three times a day.

I want to make my own wine.

I want to write a book.

My name isn’t Anonymous Host.

I like the word “ain’t” and well placed fragment sentences.

I’m not as smart as I pretend; though not as dumb either.

I’m too dumb to read the classics.

I dream about doing great things.

I love Mark Twain but have never read one of his books. I just feed from his anecdotes, quotes, and excerpts.

I read two biographies a year.

Home

Will always be where I grew up. Sometimes I GoogleEarth where I lived and look at the places I used to roam, play sports, and build forts in the woods. I use the timeline feature and try to recall a memory from each year. Some are bad, most are good. The timeline feature stops at 2010, which is a good thing because loggers leveled all those woods.

I miss it.

It’s being rented by a family I don’t know and never met.

Being a Dad

Still can’t believe it.

Marriage

Isn’t that hard but it can be ruined.

My wife is better than me. And that’s why I married her.

Ideas

Are important but not any more important than people.

People

Have come to me for advice as far back as I can remember.

I make friends easily but I only have two people I consider friends. It’s not a term to be used lightly but a title of honor to be given sparingly.

I don’t understand some of them.

One of the worst things you can do to someone is not live up to their expectations.

Will fail you; but who else can you trust?

Family

Is the most important thing in your life.

Will separate but never be too far.

Your own family supersedes your mother and father’s family.

Politics

Always does more harm than good.

Taxes

Are like dirt and air, only not as old.

Women

Really are complicated.

Have a feminine grace that can’t be explained but can’t fail to be noticed

Have a beauty that outlasts their “looks.”

Really can multitask better than men.

Were made for men. Mainly because men aren’t very good alone.

Yes, some can be trouble.

Will fall for the “bad boy” but that will pass. They prefer to marry the good boys or at least the one who have given up the “bad boy” act.

Tomorrow

Will roll around.

Will not be the day when the world will end.

Mayans

Why didn’t they create a wheel?

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Just In Case the World Ends Tomorrow…

  1. Excellent post my friend. A humbling and honest post. I enjoyed reading it. And you must read Mark Twain! I will be glad to loan you a book anytime. I recommend Life on the Mississippi. I can honestly say that is probably my favorite book of all time.

    • Jeff, jotted two books down. Thought seriously of reading that one and another one — can’t remember the name but its about his travels later in life … oh! and the book on man.

      But here’s the thing. I don’t want to ruin my idea of him. What if I don’t like the book, or find his writing laborious like all the old, great writers?

      That’s my fear.

      If you insist, and if you think I’ll like it, I’ll give one of them a try.

      • You know Twain is truly the Lincoln of American letters. Mark Twain was a true prose master. I can never feel like I’ve read enough of Twain. I read mostly his non-fiction, which I consider his best writings. Of course he’s an entertainer…which I like. Twain stills makes you laugh. He prose has the feel of a man superbly talking. I enjoy the art of it and so I don’t mind if at times it sounds a little dated. But the truth is Twain’s art is modern. Here’s the opening paragraph of an essay of Twain’s called The Privilege of the Grave:

        “Its occupant has one privilege which is not exercised by any living person: free speech. The living man is not really without this privilege–strictly speaking–but as he possesses it merely as an empty formality, and knows better than to make use of it, it cannot be seriously regarded as an actual possession. As an active privilege, it ranks with the privilege of committing murder: we may exercise it if we are willing to take the consequences. Murder is forbidden both in form and in fact; free speech is granted in form but forbidden in fact. By the common estimate both are crimes, and are held in deep odium by all civilized peoples. Murder is sometimes punished, free speech is always–when committed. Which is seldom.”

        I picked up Life of the Mississippi when thumbing through what I might send you. I must tell you it was hard to put down. Twain’s writing and storytelling draw you in. He takes you back and makes you wish you’d grown up on the Mississippi. We will never make another Mark Twain.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s